Monday, October 14, 2019

Midterm Self-Assessment

Here is a midterm reflection assignment, due by the Friday after the break (to Blackboard, using the template, in a word-processed file; include the questions below so it is obvious to the reader what you are responding to, please):
1. What is your Tigernet/Banner midterm grade?
2. What is your Blackboard midterm grade, your earned points or percentage of total points? (If there are any errors or omissions or misunderstandings in grading, please let the instructor know). 
3. How are you doing in this class? (Optional: how are you doing in other classes?)
4. What are you doing well? *Why* are you doing well at these things?
5. What are you not doing well at? *Why* are you not doing well at these things? What do you want to change? *Why* do you want to change?
6. What, if anything, should you change about what you do before class? What, if anything, should you change about what you do during class? What, if anything, should you change about what you do after class?
7. What can the instructor do to better help you?
8. What other thoughts and/or feelings do you have concerning your performance in this class (and any other classes), or anything else relevant?

Tuesday, September 17, 2019

Ethics, Left and Right: The Moral Issues That Divide Us

 

Ethics, Left and Right

The Moral Issues That Divide Us

Bob Fischer

  • Provides a model of civil dialogue for contentious moral issues--one that students can appreciate and emulate--through a series of commissioned essays on twenty contentious debates, written expressly with undergraduate students in mind
  • Engages students in moral philosophy by examining highly relevant issues that students encounter in our current social and political landscape
  • Presents two position pieces on each issue--one left-leaning, one right--followed by a reply from each author, giving you and your students the opportunity to engage in in-depth discussions of serious issues
  • Prepares students to think philosophically and critically with an introductory chapter on ethical theory, moral reasoning, and arguments
  • Includes case studies at the end of every main contribution to encourage students to examine related problems and/or delve deeper into the current issue
  • An Ancillary Resource Center (ARC) contains an Instructor's Manual, a Computerized Test Bank, and PowerPoint lecture slides
  • A Companion Website offers student resources including self-quizzes and web links

Thursday, August 15, 2019

Fall Classes

Intro to Philosophical Ethics - 44370 - HPHI 302G - 01

Syllabus!

TypeTimeDaysWhereDate RangeSchedule TypeInstructors
Class10:00 am - 10:50 amMWFSale Hall 105Aug 21, 2019 - Dec 13, 2019LectureNathan M. Nobis (P)E-mail

Intro to Philosophical Ethics - 44371 - HPHI 302G - 02

Syllabus!
Scheduled Meeting Times
TypeTimeDaysWhereDate RangeSchedule TypeInstructors
Class11:00 am - 11:50 amMWFSale Hall 105Aug 21, 2019 - Dec 13, 2019LectureNathan M. Nobis (P)E-mail

Modern Philosophy - 46023 - HPHI 311 - 01
Syllabus!

TypeTimeDaysWhereDate RangeSchedule TypeInstructors
Class1:00 pm - 1:50 pmMWFSale Hall 110Aug 21, 2019 - Dec 13, 2019LectureNathan M. Nobis (P)E-mail

Special Top: Bioethics - 46241 - HPHI 475 - 01
Associated Term: Fall 2019
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2019 to Aug 30, 2019
Levels: Undergraduate

Syllabus!
Scheduled Meeting Times
TypeTimeDaysWhereDate RangeSchedule TypeInstructors
Class9:00 am - 9:50 amMWFSale Hall 110Aug 21, 2019 - Dec 13, 2019LectureNathan M. Nobis (P)E-mail

Friday, July 26, 2019

Abortion and Soundbites

New! "Abortion and Soundbites: Why Pro-Choice Arguments Are Harder to Make" in Areo Magazine!



Thursday, June 27, 2019

Thinking Critically About Abortion

Wednesday, May 29, 2019

Open Access (OER) Ethics Textbook

Here's a new open-access ethics textbook with three essays by, me and me and a co-author, in it.



UNIT ONE: INTRODUCTION TO CONTEMPORARY ETHICS: TECHNOLOGY, AFFIRMATIVE ACTION, AND IMMIGRATION
1 The “Trolley Problem” and Self-Driving Cars: Your Car’s Moral Settings (Noah Levin)
2 What is Ethics and What Makes Something a Problem for Morality? (David Svolba)
3 Letter from the Birmingham City Jail (Martin Luther King, Jr)
4 A Defense of Affirmative Action (Noah Levin)
5 The Moral Issues of Immigration (B.M. Wooldridge)
6 The Ethics of our Digital Selves (Noah Levin)

UNIT TWO: TORTURE, DEATH, AND THE “GREATER GOOD”
7 The Ethics of Torture (Martine Berenpas)
8 What Moral Obligations do we have (or not have) to Impoverished Peoples? (B.M. Wooldridge)
9 Euthanasia, or Mercy Killing (Nathan Nobis)
10 An Argument Against Capital Punishment (Noah Levin)
11 Common Arguments about Abortion (Nathan Nobis & Kristina Grob)
12 Better (Philosophical) Arguments about Abortion (Nathan Nobis & Kristina Grob)

UNIT THREE: PERSONS, AUTONOMY, THE ENVIRONMENT, AND RIGHTS
13 Animal Rights (Eduardo Salazar)
14 John Rawls and the “Veil of Ignorance” (Ben Davies)
15 Environmental Ethics: Climate Change (Jonathan Spelman)
16 Rape, Date Rape, and the “Affirmative Consent” Law in California (Noah Levin)
17 The Ethics of Pornography: Deliberating on a Modern Harm (Eduardo Salazar)
18 The Social Contract (Thomas Hobbes)

UNIT FOUR: HAPPINESS
19 Is Pleasure all that Matters? Thoughts on the “Experience Machine” (Prabhpal Singh)
20 Utilitarianism (J.S. Mill)
21 Utilitarianism: Pros and Cons (B.M. Wooldridge)
22 Existentialism, Genetic Engineering, and the Meaning of Life: The Fifths (Noah Levin)
23 The Solitude of the Self (Elizabeth Cady Stanton)
24 Game Theory, the Nash Equilibrium, and the Prisoner’s Dilemma (Douglas E. Hill)

UNIT FIVE: RELIGION, LAW, AND ABSOLUTE MORALITY
25 The Myth of Gyges and The Crito (Plato)
26 God, Morality, and Religion (Kristin Seemuth Whaley)
27 The Categorical Imperative (Immanuel Kant)
28 The Virtues (Aristotle)
29 Beyond Good and Evil (Friedrich Nietzsche)
30 Other Moral Theories: Subjectivism, Relativism, Emotivism, Intuitionism, etc. (Jan F. Jacko)
https://www.ngefarpress.com/2019/05/introduction-to-ethics-open-educational.html  

Monday, May 27, 2019

Summer Morehouse Classes

Syllabus


Intro to Philosophical Ethics - 42527 - HPHI 302G - 01
Associated Term: Summer 2019
Levels: Undergraduate

Morehouse College Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Bookstore(change me)

Scheduled Meeting Times
TypeTimeDaysWhereDate RangeSchedule TypeInstructors
Class10:30 am - 11:50 amMTWRFSale Hall 110Jun 04, 2019 - Jul 05, 2019LectureNathan M. Nobis (P)E-mail

Intro to Phil Ethics-Online - 42664 - HPHI 302G - 2
Associated Term: Summer 2019
Levels: Undergraduate

Morehouse College Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Bookstore(change me)

Scheduled Meeting Times
TypeTimeDaysWhereDate RangeSchedule TypeInstructors
ClassTBAMTWRFTBAJun 04, 2019 - Jul 12, 2019LectureNathan M. Nobis (P)E-mail

Saturday, April 27, 2019

Response to "Nathan Nobis' Summary of Pro-Choice Arguments"

Someone wrote a response to my 1000-Word Philosophy essay on abortion, entitled "Nathan Nobis' Summary of Pro-Choice Arguments.I wrote brief a reply and twice posted it on their blog, but it twice "disappeared" (. . but it might have returned, so I really don't know whether it's posted or not), so I post this reply here since I did take the time to write it up. 

See below the fold, please. 

Wednesday, April 17, 2019

Summer Ethics class

Intro to Philosophical Ethics - 42527 - HPHI 302G - 01
Associated Term: Summer 2019
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2019 to Jul 06, 2019
Levels: Undergraduate

Morehouse College Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Bookstore(change me)

Scheduled Meeting Times
TypeTimeDaysWhereDate RangeSchedule TypeInstructors
Class10:30 am - 11:50 amMTWRFSale Hall 106Jun 04, 2019 - Jul 05, 2019LectureNathan M. Nobis (P)E-mail

Monday, April 01, 2019

A Letter to the Editor on Abortion

A letter to the editor: "Dear Decaturish - Thinking Critically About Abortion"



Two additional readings on the issues:


Friday, March 29, 2019

Question-Begging Arguments on Abortion


Many arguments about abortion are bad. Sometimes this is because they “beg the question,” or assume the argument’s conclusion as a premise. Question-begging arguments against abortion assume that abortion is wrong or that fetuses are wrong to kill; question-begging arguments in favor of abortion assume that abortions are not wrong or that fetuses are not wrong to kill. This is circular reasoning and must always be dismissed.