Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Open Culture


Thanks to Open Culture - the best free cultural & educational media on the web - for posting about my book!

Download Animals and Ethics 101: Thinking Critically About Animal Rights (Free)

FYI: Nathan Nobis, a philosophy professor at Morehouse College in Atlanta, recently published Animals and Ethics 101: Thinking Critically About Animal RightsA well-reviewed introduction to animal ethics, the textbook (created to accompany an online course on the same subject) evaluates the arguments for and against various uses of animals, including:
  • Is it morally wrong to experiment on animals? Why or why not?
  • Is it morally permissible to eat meat? Why or why not?
  • Are we morally obligated to provide pets with veterinary care (and, if so, how much)? Why or why not?
You can buy the paperback on Amazon for $5.99 or Kindle for $2.99. But Nobis has also made the text available free online, under a Creative Commons license. You can download it in multiple formats here.

Monday, March 20, 2017

Open Educational Resources

A library presentation on Open Educational Resources, such as Animals & Ethics 101.

Simple Arguments

Some very simple arguments, to form into syllogisms:

1. Her shoes are new so they must be expensive.
2. He must drive a sports car; after all, he is having a mid-life crisis.
3. They are very sad because they lost their dog.
4. We should help poor people because we can.
5. Abortion is wrong since fetuses are living.

What's the conclusion of each argument? What's the stated premise? What premise to you have to add to make the argument a syllogism? 

Tuesday, February 28, 2017

"Evidence-Based Care for the Elderly"

Samuel K. Williams and Joanne M. Braxton and Melissa Gosdin and Nathan Nobis et. al. "Evidence-Based Care for the Elderly: Uses of “the Grandmother Principle”." Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved 28, no. 1 (2017): 1-7.  

Monday, February 13, 2017

How to Have a Philosophical Discussion

Someone recently asked me how to have philosophical conversations or discussions. Here are some quick guidelines, focusing on philosophical discussions about moral issues:

1. Topic?

You need to clearly identify a topic or issue. Sometimes that's easy, sometimes people "dance around" a topic -- raising related issues about a topic -- before getting an exact topic.

2. Conclusions?

You need to identify a conclusion(s) about the topic. Sometimes you need to think about what various words in those conclusions mean: ask, "What do you mean?"

3. Premises? 

You need to identify a premise(s) or reason(s) given in favor of that conclusion. For many moral issues, at least one premise is often an empirical or scientific claim, and at least one premise is a moral principle, that is, a claim about when an action is wrong or not. Sometimes you need to think about what various words in those premises mean: ask, "What do you mean?"

4. Unstated Premises? 

You need to identify an unstated premise(s) or reason(s) given in favor of that conclusion: these are part of the argument, but are sometimes not yet stated. (However, sometimes they are!) These premises need to be identified so the full argument is stated. Doing this is often called stating the argument in logically valid form. This handout and this video give guidance on doing that:



5. Soundness?

Once the full pattern of reasoning is stated, i.e., it is in logically valid form, you need to evaluate the argument as sound or not: are the premises true or false, supported by good evidence or not? If at least one premise is false, then the argument is sound and does not provide a good reason to accept the conclusion. You need to check the facts to see if any factual claims are true, and try to identify any strong counterexamples to any moral principles.

This process can and should be repeated with any and all premises given in favor of a conclusion, and for different conclusions and the premises given in their favor. You must focus on one and only one argument at a time.

Details forthcoming!

Tuesday, December 13, 2016

A Rulebook for Students

I am working on a college student-success book and am looking for collaborators. Information is below. Interested in contributing? Email me! It will be an open access book and also available on Amazon.
A Rulebook for Students 
Success in College

& Beyond

About this book

Some rules are meant to be broken and there are exceptions to many rules. For college students, though, there are rules they can follow that will contribute to success in their classes: they will learn more, have more enjoyable and rewarding class experiences, impress their professors with their involvement and quality work and, perhaps most importantly, get better grades.
College is an opportunity that can open the door to greater opportunities, and the more you make of your opportunities in college, the greater your chances for success beyond college, in many ways. Following these rules below will increase your likelihood of success, in many ways.
Below is first a list of rules, and below that list is a discussion of each rule. When any rule seems obvious, consider it a good reminder of what you should do. If any rule is new to you, think about how you can integrate into your practices as a student. And since a basic rule of college is to think critically, if you think some rule is a bad one, let us know why: you may be right!
With this all in mind, let us turn to the rules and the discussion of them.

++++

You can see what I am slowly up to here: http://rulebookforstudents.blogspot.com/ 

Thursday, December 01, 2016

J-Mester 2017

Many people say that violence is wrong, and that violence is only morally justified under extreme circumstances. But what about violence towards animals? On any common definition of 'violence', animals are treated violently when they are raised and killed to be eaten, or experimented on for medical research or used for other purposes that, arguably, harm them. What, if anything, then would justify this violence? What, if anything, would morally justify common, yet often very violent, treatment and uses of animals? In this course, we will explore a range of answers to these questions, given by influential philosophers, scientists and advocates on all sides. Topics include: theories of ethics, animal minds, and ethical issues concerning the uses of animals for food, clothing, experimentation, entertainment, hunting, as companions or pets, and other purposes. 
The course is organized Nathan Nobis's recent book Animals & Ethics 101: Thinking Critically About Animal Rights at www.AnimalEthics101.com 

Sunday, November 27, 2016

Surveys about Animal Research

Ari Joffe, MD, has done a number of surveys related to animal research and the arguments given for and against it. I need to do more to share this research but here is a start. Abstracts are also below the fold:
1.
2.
Joffe AR, Bara M, Anton N, Nobis N.
BMC Med Ethics. 2016 Mar 29;17:17. doi: 10.1186/s12910-016-0100-x.

PMID:
 
27025215
 
Free PMC Article
3.
Joffe AR, Bara M, Anton N, Nobis N.
BMC Med Ethics. 2015 May 7;16:29. doi: 10.1186/s12910-015-0024-x.

PMID:
 
25947255
 
Free PMC Article
4.
Joffe AR, Bara M, Anton N, Nobis N.
Philos Ethics Humanit Med. 2014 Dec 30;9:20. doi: 10.1186/s13010-014-0020-7.

PMID:
 
25547734
 
Free PMC Article

Tuesday, October 25, 2016

Moral Expertise

A paper plan, for a forthcoming volume on moral expertise:

“Trust Me, I’m a Moral Expert!”:
Moral Disagreements, Avoidable Beliefs and Unavoidable Actions


If you have a problem, you should often seek an expert for insight and guidance. Such is true in medicine, law, mental health, auto and home repair and much more. So, if you have a moral problem, a difficult problem beyond your ability to see what you should do about it, you might want to seek a moral expert, it seems.[1]   
            In this essay we discuss, first, how to identify genuine moral experts and avoid pseudo-moral experts and, second, theoretical and practice questions about what to believe and do when genuine moral experts disagree.

Wednesday, October 19, 2016

Animal Experimentation

Here is a 500 word essay on animal research, invited for an online magazine, for a "debate" on "whether animal testing should be banned." This was posted here.

Animal Testing Should Be Banned

“Animal testing” involves experimenting on animals to try to determine whether drugs and medical treatments are safe and effective for humans. It’s wrong and should be banned.

Sunday, October 16, 2016

On Philosophical Counseling

THE BIG QUESTIONS

Would you ditch your therapist for a “philosophical counselor”?


Instead of going to traditional psychotherapists for advice and support, growing numbers of people are turning to philosophical counselors for particularly wise guidance. These counselors work much like traditional psychotherapists. But instead of offering solutions based solely on their understanding of mental health or psychology, philosophical counselors offer solutions and guidance drawn from the writings of great thinkers.

Saturday, October 08, 2016

Animals & Ethics 101: Thinking Critically About Animal Rights

Nathan Nobis. Animals & Ethics 101: Thinking Critically About Animal Rights. Open Philosophy Press, 2016. 

Buy the book on Amazon in paperback for $5.99 or Kindle for $2.99, or download the book for free

Available through www.AnimalEthics101.com



Thursday, September 29, 2016

Tweet, Tweet!

Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Philosophy and Feelings

Philosophy prizes reason and arguments, clear and critical thinking.

What, then, does philosophy say about emotions, about feelings?

Let's think, briefly, about feelings. 

Monday, September 12, 2016

Recent Publications

Some recent publications (8/6/16):
I am currently at work on a (text)book entitled Making Moral Progress: A Moral Arguments WorkbookThis book evaluates moral arguments using basic formal logic and starts with common arguments, what ordinary people often say about the issues, before moving on to arguments from developed by philosophers. The book will be useful for a variety of audiences and contexts. We plan for it to be an open access book, freely available to all electronically, as well as a low cost paperback.