Sunday, April 15, 2018

Review of Nathan Nobis's Animals & Ethics 101

Xenotransplantation, Subsistence Hunting and the Pursuit of Health: Lessons for Animal Rights-Based Vegan Advocacy

Abstract

I argue that, contrary to what Tom Regan suggests, his rights view implies that subsistence hunting is wrong, that is, killing animals for food is wrong even when they are the only available food source, since doing so violates animal rights. We can see that subsistence hunting is wrong on the rights view by seeing why animal experimentation, specifically xenotransplanation, is wrong on the rights view: if it’s wrong to kill an animal to take organs to save a human life, it’s wrong to kill an animal to eat that animal to save a human life or improve human health. I discuss these arguments’ implications for animal rights-based vegan advocacy, insofar as some people claim that they don’t feel their best on vegan diets and so their eating meat is morally justified. I argue that such an attempt to justify consuming animal products fails on Regan’s rights view, but discuss some attempts to morally excuse such violations of animals’ rights. These attempts are inspired by Regan’s attempts at potentially excusing animal rights advocates’ using medications developed using animals.

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Should Chimpanzees Be Considered ‘Persons’?

I contributed to this article and project. - Nathan

Should Chimpanzees Be Considered ‘Persons’?

Image
CreditIllustration by Najeebah Al-Ghadban; Photograph by Entienou, via Getty Images

Relativism, Opinions, Truth and Facts

Relativism, Opinions, Truth and Facts

People often give their views on a topic and then declare those views to be “True to them.” About someone else’s views, they might say those views are not “true to us.” "My truth," "Not our truth" and so on are common.


(What topics do people sometimes say things like this about? What topics do people generally not say things like this about? Thoughtful lists here would be interesting and, likely, useful.)


Two questions:
  1. What do people mean by saying things like this, that “This is true to me,” or “To us, that’s not true”?
  2. If something is, as they say, “true to [fill in the relevant individual or group],” then does that really mean it’s true? If something “is not true to them,” does that mean it’s false?  



Thursday, April 05, 2018

In Progress

An introductory chapter on abortion, in progress.

Comments welcome, although, again, the paper is an incomplete work in progress, of course!

Tuesday, February 27, 2018

Monday, February 26, 2018

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Moral Syllogisms

A video from a few years ago about moral arguments and the recently found PowerPoint file it is based on:


Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Spring 2018 Classes

Intro to Philosophical Ethics - 43875 - HPHI 302G - 01

SYLLABUS IN GOOGLE DOCS
Associated Term: Spring 2018
TypeTimeDaysWhereDate RangeSchedule TypeInstructors
Class10:00 am - 10:50 amMWFSale Hall 105Jan 17, 2018 - May 11, 2018LectureNathan M. Nobis (P)E-mail

Intro to Philosophical Ethics - 43876 - HPHI 302G - 02

SYLLABUS IN GOOGLE DOCS
Associated Term: Spring 2018
TypeTimeDaysWhereDate RangeSchedule TypeInstructors
Class11:00 am - 11:50 amMWFSale Hall 105Jan 17, 2018 - May 11, 2018LectureNathan M. Nobis (P)E-mail

Modern Philosophy - 45938 - HPHI 311 - 01

SYLLABUS IN GOOGLE DOCS
Associated Term: Spring 2018


TypeTimeDaysWhereDate RangeSchedule TypeInstructors
Class1:00 pm - 1:50 pmMWFSale Hall 110Jan 17, 2018 - May 11, 2018LectureNathan M. Nobis (P)E-mail

Abortion and Animal Rights: Does Either Topic Lead to the Other?

Abortion and Animal Rights: Does Either Topic Lead to the Other? by [Nobis, Nathan]
Kindle App Ad 

Abortion and Animal Rights: Does Either Topic Lead to the Other? Kindle Edition

Monday, January 08, 2018

J-Mester

A #Morehouse J-Mester 2018 course in Philosophy: 
Ethics and Animals: Violence or Non-Violence?

January 8 – 12, 2018, 9 am - 12 pm
Location: Wheeler, 218
Many people say that violence is wrong, and that violence is only morally justified under extreme circumstances. But what about violence towards animals? On any common definition of 'violence', animals are treated violently when they are raised and killed to be eaten, or experimented on for medical research or used for other purposes that, arguably, harm them. What, if anything, then would justify this violence? In this course, we will explore a range of answers to these questions, given by influential philosophers, scientists and advocates on all sides. Topics include: theories of ethics, animal minds, and ethical issues concerning the uses of animals for food, clothing, experimentation, entertainment, hunting, as companions or pets, and other purposes.  Students will write a number of short papers that develop positions on theoretical and practice issues concerning ethics and animals, giving reasons for their support, or defending themselves from possible objections and criticisms. Students will watch a variety of documentary films and likely take field trips to meet with experts to address ethical issues at places such as the Atlanta Humane Society, Zoo Atlanta, the Georgia Aquarium, Morehouse School of Medicine, and a local animal farm and /or sanctuary. We will also likely some guest speakers from local animal advocacy groups, such as The Humane League and the Atlanta Black Vegetarian Society. 

Thursday, November 09, 2017

Updates and Notes to Self!

Thursday, August 17, 2017

Fall 2017 Classes

Intro to Philosophical Ethics - 44370 - HPHI 302G - 01
Syllabus in Word
Syllabus and Notes in Google Docs format
Scheduled Meeting Times
TypeTimeDaysWhereDate RangeSchedule TypeInstructors
Class12:00 pm - 12:50 pmMWFSale Hall 105Aug 16, 2017 - Dec 08, 2017LectureNathan M. Nobis (P)E-mail

Intro to Philosophical Ethics - 44371 - HPHI 302G - 02
Syllabus in Word
Syllabus and Notes in Google Docs format
Scheduled Meeting Times
TypeTimeDaysWhereDate RangeSchedule TypeInstructors
Class1:00 pm - 1:50 pmMWFSale Hall 105Aug 16, 2017 - Dec 08, 2017LectureNathan M. Nobis (P)E-mail

Theory of Knowledge - 45588 - HPHI 303 - 01
Syllabus in Google Docs
Scheduled Meeting Times
TypeTimeDaysWhereDate RangeSchedule TypeInstructors
ClassDIRECTED READINGS: MEET WITH INSTRUCTORSale HallAug 16, 2017 - Dec 08, 2017LectureNathan M. Nobis (P)E-mail

Some teaching documents:

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Race-related Controversial Ethical Issues

A quick list of race-related controversial ethical issues; please email me with topics to add or comment below:
  • affirmative action
  • reparations
  • racism
  • racial discrimination
  • racial stereotypes
  • racial solidarity or racial pride
  • racialized sexual/romantic preferences
  • racial profiling
  • implicit bias
  • slavery
  • racially-oriented hate speech and hate crimes
  • mass incarceration
  • policing
  • racial jokes
  • transracialism
  • honoring racist founders and symbols
  • protest
  • self-respect
  • microaggressions
  • cultural appropriation
  • whiteness & white privilege
  • Social Darwinism
  • BLM
  • Intersectionality with sexism (and more)
  • passing & travelling
  • economic injustice
  • redlining 
  • health disparities
  • "language usage" - e.g., certain names being used for certain groups, by people within those groups and people not part of those groups. 
  • representation of race in media and arts