Thursday, December 01, 2016

J-Mester 2017

Many people say that violence is wrong, and that violence is only morally justified under extreme circumstances. But what about violence towards animals? On any common definition of 'violence', animals are treated violently when they are raised and killed to be eaten, or experimented on for medical research or used for other purposes that, arguably, harm them. What, if anything, then would justify this violence? What, if anything, would morally justify common, yet often very violent, treatment and uses of animals? In this course, we will explore a range of answers to these questions, given by influential philosophers, scientists and advocates on all sides. Topics include: theories of ethics, animal minds, and ethical issues concerning the uses of animals for food, clothing, experimentation, entertainment, hunting, as companions or pets, and other purposes. 
The course is organized Nathan Nobis's recent book Animals & Ethics 101: Thinking Critically About Animal Rights at www.AnimalEthics101.com 
More information below!

@ Morehouse College, Jan 9 – 13, 2017

Location: Wheeler 308, 9 AM - noon, Tuesday-Friday; MONDAY is 1-4 (but we end early): this change was because of the weather issues.



TABLE OF CONTENTS


Course description:

with Dr. Nathan Nobis, Associate Professor of Philosophy, Jan 9 – 13, 2017, usually 9 AM - 12 noon
Many people say that violence is wrong, and that violence is only morally justified under extreme circumstances. But what about violence towards animals? On any common definition of 'violence', animals are treated violently when they are raised and killed to be eaten, or experimented on for medical research or used for other purposes that, arguably, harm them. What, if anything, then would justify this violence? What, if anything, would morally justify common, yet often very violent, treatment and uses of animals? In this course, we will explore a range of answers to these questions, given by influential philosophers, scientists and advocates on all sides. Topics include: theories of ethics, animal minds, and ethical issues concerning the uses of animals for food, clothing, experimentation, entertainment, hunting, as companions or pets, and other purposes.
The course is organized Nathan Nobis's recent book Animals & Ethics 101: Thinking Critically About Animal Rights at www.AnimalEthics101.com

Instructor contact: Nathan.Nobis@morehouse.edu, www.NathanNobis.com, 404-825-1740 (text first, please)  

Initial writing assignment

, due to instructor by email by  Thursday, January 5th no later than 12:00pm noon:

Animals are used for food, in experimentation and research and for clothing, among other uses. First, describe how animals are used for these purposes, i.e., how they are treated and what happens to them. (Document your sources for this information). Second, Second, explain whether you think that it is morally or ethically right or wrong to treat animals these ways and why. (Optional: explain what someone who thinks the opposite of you might say, and how you would respond to their view). Third, what, if anything, do you think that you individually, and we as a society, should do about the treatment of animals and why?

I'd suspect that this should be at least 2-3 pages, double-spaced. But likely the more the better!

Thanks and I look forward to our course! And I will be sending more updates soon.

Assignments and requirements:

  • Attend all morning sessions, for the whole session.
  • Assigned readings and open-ended research reading.
  • Daily “research reflections” submitted by email before class on that day where you
  • (a) answer AT LEAST TWO discussion questions from EACH OF the book chapters and
  • (b) summarize and reflect on your afternoon readings and research; be prepared to share your answers
  • and reactions.
  • Participate in class discussion.
  • Put away all electronic devices and distractions, unless we are using them for research.
  • Give our guest speakers your full attention. Ask questions.
  • Ideally, participate in any afternoon field trips that couldn’t be arranged during the morning session.


Local west end vegan restaurants to visit: restaurant tour map:


  • Vegan Dream Donuts
  • Soul Veg South
  • Healthful Essence
  • Tassilla’s Raw Reality
  • Viva La Vegan

Resources:











Films:

Animal-ethics-related films on Netflix: http://www.peta2.com/blog/animal-rights-movies-netflix/


Schedule-in-Progress




Weekend before (optional)
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Weekend after (optional)
Readings topics for that 9-12 day (reading done the day before, at least)







Guest speakers / Field trips
Pig event cancelled
Time change: 1-2:30 class time this Monday due to weather. (NN has to leave earlier than 4 due to an appointment)
NO SPEAKERS -
OVERVIEW DAY, A CRASH COURSE IN LOGIC, ETHICS, AND ANIMALS & ETHICS

“Moral Syllogisms video”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xw8DJQRYWXg

Core Ethical concepts:
Discussion: chapters 1, 2, 3 & 4, from Animal Ethics 101, with a focus on chapter 3, the “theories of animal ethics”



Now,  speakers from Emory’s Animal Legal Defense Fund: https://www.facebook.com/EmoryLawSALDF  


Meghan Smith from the Humane League, Atlanta. 10:30-12


Other organizations, that won’t present:

Georgia Animal Rights & Protection http://garpga.org/

Compassion in World Farming: http://www.ciwf.com/ ?
Chef Zu from King’s Apron ?: https://www.facebook.com/kingsapron/

10:30-12 Ethical Choices Program, Lorena Prieto Mucke:  http://www.ethicalchoicesprogram.org/our-presentations 10:30-12
Carrie Freeman, GSU http://www.framingfarming.com
Two possible events:

Meet some pigs!


Event, in Douglasville: 3-6 PM


&

Full Circle Farm Sanctuary tour:  https://www.facebook.com/events/1705218946455281/



Saturday, January 14 at 3 PM - 4:30 PM
Next Week

pin
961 White House Parkway, Warm Springs, Georgia 31830
Afternoon readings & experiences
Read as much of Animals & Ethics 101 as possible.
Animals & Ethics 101, Chapters 1 & 2; check out the links in the text; online independent research on the topics
Animals & Ethics 101, Chapters 3 & 4; check out the links in the text; online independent research on the topics

Animals & Ethics 101, Chapters 5; check out the links in the text; online independent research on the topics
Animals & Ethics 101, Chapters 6 & 7; check out the links in the text; online independent research on the topics
Animals & Ethics 101, Chapter 8; check out the links in the text; online independent research on the topics


Monday notes:


Some actions you think most people would think are wrong”
  • Cheating on a spouse..
  • Killing babies.. But not to save the world or anything like that..
  • Stealing from poor people
  • Taking hostages.
  • ____ in the pool
  • Harming innocents..
  • Rape..
  • Cannibalism.. When not necessary..
  • Sexual harassment or assault that is not wanted..
  • Drug addictions..

So, what makes wrong actions wrong? When are actions wrong?

Utilitarians: actions that reduce unhappiness and increase happiness tend to be “right”

Kant: moral rights: actions that use others [rational beings] as mere means to our ends tend to be wrong.

Regan:
It’s not just rational beings who have rights, it’s this:
Anyone who is “subject of a life,” : if you are conscious, have thoughts, feelings, awareness, emotions,
They have a life that can go better and/or worse from their own point of view;
and these are all unified in a single subject, then you have the basic right to respectful treatment.

Rawls - Mark Rowlands.. : “veil of ignorance,” actions are wrong when you wouldn’t agree to those actions being done
IF YOU DIDN’T KNOW WHO YOU WERE IN THE SITUATION.


Tuesday notes:

Field trip: 11 AM - 12 PM http://www.tassilisrawreality.com/


Leave at 10:30? Walk? Drive?
Guest speakers tomorrow from Emory Law Schools Animal Legal Defense Fund AND The Humane League

Presentation of the reasoning behind Singer’s, Regan’s and Rowlands’ theories of animal ethics.

Wednesday notes:



Something is a person only if that someone pays taxes. T or F?

Something is a person only if that someone “contributes to society.” T or F?

Someone is a person only if they have obligations and duties to others. ?

Thursday notes:


Some stuff:
  • Speaker Lorena @ 10:15, from the Ethical Choices Program

Persons.. ..

If something is not a person, then we can treat it however we want. Or it’s not wrong to do whatever we want to it.

Experimentation

  • Choosing between animal life and human life.
    • Sometimes, if you do some experiment on animals, then humans will be saved.
    • If you don’t do the experiment, then the humans will die or be harmed

Wearing animals.
Fur industry.






Friday notes:


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